The South Australian Political Landscape

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Re: The South Australian Political Landscape

Postby Magellan » Mon Mar 19, 2018 8:59 am

MW wrote:I heard on 5AA this morning that 7 of the last 8 elections, the Libs had the majority of the popular vote. Clearly the boundaries needed to change.

I thought they had already changed, and which was arguably a factor in Saturday night's Liberal win?
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Re: The South Australian Political Landscape

Postby mighty_tiger_79 » Mon Mar 19, 2018 9:05 am

Booney wrote:It was the ad, pure and simple, even those who were thinking about voting SA Best realized the bloke was a clown when that his the airwaves. Lack of policy aside, keep in mind not all voters actually care about policy some work purely on popularity, the ad was his death sentence.

He'd be a broken man I reckon.


The ad was the first step on the downhill slide and then it was the lack of policy. Im not huge on policy but when candidates (johanson) on the radio admit they havent read the policies that was the crash for me!

I think others have mentioned it, but Nick saw the pre-xmas polls and instead of wanting just Balance of Power he wanted the Premiership. He spread himself too thin and didnt really vet his potential candidates thoroughly.
Then when the polls were turning against him he just wanted the Balance of Power....
Booooooooooo
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Re: The South Australian Political Landscape

Postby Jim05 » Mon Mar 19, 2018 9:06 am

Jimmy_041 wrote:Koutsantonis making an absolute idiot of himself on 5AA

Again?
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Re: The South Australian Political Landscape

Postby jo172 » Mon Mar 19, 2018 9:20 am

mighty_tiger_79 wrote:
Booney wrote:It was the ad, pure and simple, even those who were thinking about voting SA Best realized the bloke was a clown when that his the airwaves. Lack of policy aside, keep in mind not all voters actually care about policy some work purely on popularity, the ad was his death sentence.

He'd be a broken man I reckon.


The ad was the first step on the downhill slide and then it was the lack of policy. Im not huge on policy but when candidates (johanson) on the radio admit they havent read the policies that was the crash for me!

I think others have mentioned it, but Nick saw the pre-xmas polls and instead of wanting just Balance of Power he wanted the Premiership. He spread himself too thin and didnt really vet his potential candidates thoroughly.
Then when the polls were turning against him he just wanted the Balance of Power....


The schadenfreude of all the dickheads who signed up to run for SA Best on the assumption paying $20k would get them a nice cushy seat in parliament (with the attendant salary and perks) failing is rather delightful.
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Re: The South Australian Political Landscape

Postby Gozu » Mon Mar 19, 2018 10:04 am

Magellan wrote:
MW wrote:I heard on 5AA this morning that 7 of the last 8 elections, the Libs had the majority of the popular vote. Clearly the boundaries needed to change.

I thought they had already changed, and which was arguably a factor in Saturday night's Liberal win?


Labor actually increased their vote at this election over last election which is incredible after 16 years too, the redistribution was the reason the Libs won.

The cards finally land in the right places for the Liberals in South Australia, despite an overall swing in Labor’s favour.

The Liberals have finally managed to piece together a victory in South Australia, at the third successive election at which they won the statewide two-party vote. The election was actually won for them in the redistribution, which made four seats won by Labor in 2014 notionally Liberal, with only one going the other way. If the 2014 election had been held under the new boundaries, the Liberals would have made it to 25 seats out of 47 (albeit with a 0.1% margin in Newland), which as likely as not is where this election will leave them when the dust settles.


https://www.pollbludger.net/2018/03/18/ ... e-lucky-2/
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Re: The South Australian Political Landscape

Postby Jimmy_041 » Mon Mar 19, 2018 10:43 am

The cards finally land in the right places for the Liberals in South Australia, despite an overall swing in Labor’s favour.

The Liberals have finally managed to piece together a victory in South Australia, at the third successive election at which they won the statewide two-party vote. The election was actually won for them in the redistribution, which made four seats won by Labor in 2014 notionally Liberal, with only one going the other way. If the 2014 election had been held under the new boundaries, the Liberals would have made it to 25 seats out of 47 (albeit with a 0.1% margin in Newland), which as likely as not is where this election will leave them when the dust settles.


https://www.pollbludger.net/2018/03/18/ ... e-lucky-2/[/quote]

Correct, but hardly from the cards landing in the right place.
They finally stopped playing gentlemen’s rules and took on the ECSA
Don’t forget the original decision was just as bad as previous ones but the party threatened them with legal action. Boomtish; out came the groundbreaking changes which the SC would not change

As for the swing to Labor; a union mate of mine says their polling showed that there would be due to the Fed Govt being on the nose. Hence why Labor went in so strong on the “Standing up for SA”
Apparently only 3 state governments have been elected with their party in federal government

As someone else said; regardless of whom you support; it was certainly interesting
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Re: The South Australian Political Landscape

Postby heater31 » Mon Mar 19, 2018 10:52 am

Jimmy_041 wrote:Apparently only 3 state governments have been elected with their party in federal government


Since 1990.
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Re: The South Australian Political Landscape

Postby Magellan » Mon Mar 19, 2018 10:54 am

Irrespective of who you 'barrack' for in the political game, at least Saturday night delivered the state a majority government and relative stability compared to the horse-trading and deal-making that would've occurred under a hung parliament.
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Re: The South Australian Political Landscape

Postby morell » Mon Mar 19, 2018 11:50 am

And we're off.

New SA Premier Steven Marshall vows to scrap Tesla's plans for world's biggest virtual power plant targeting low income households, in favour of a $100 million subsidy for those homes already with solar.

Makes total sense. :lol: :rolleyes:

Going to be a fun four years
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Re: The South Australian Political Landscape

Postby MW » Mon Mar 19, 2018 11:52 am

morell wrote:And we're off.

New SA Premier Steven Marshall vows to scrap Tesla's plans for world's biggest virtual power plant targeting low income households, in favour of a $100 million subsidy for those homes already with solar.

Makes total sense. :lol: :rolleyes:

Going to be a fun four years


What a f..king joke...
So those without Solar get nothing.
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Re: The South Australian Political Landscape

Postby Booney » Mon Mar 19, 2018 12:00 pm

Just bolted my chair and desk down, I can't work if this gets sold off.
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Re: The South Australian Political Landscape

Postby Jimmy_041 » Mon Mar 19, 2018 12:04 pm

Magellan wrote:Irrespective of who you 'barrack' for in the political game, at least Saturday night delivered the state a majority government and relative stability compared to the horse-trading and deal-making that would've occurred under a hung parliament.


Still going to have to deal with the Upper House (the one Rau wanted to abolish)
It will be interesting to see if Labor go the scorched earth policy like what's been happening in the federal sphere for the past 9 years
With Liberals and Labor both on 8, 2x SA Best, probably 2 Greens, John Darley & Dennis Hood; they probably have a fair chance of getting most sane ideas through

I had an interesting conversation with Darley about Geoff Brock on Saturday........
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Re: The South Australian Political Landscape

Postby Booney » Mon Mar 19, 2018 12:09 pm

My rich mates with big solar panels need batteries, those of you on low income won't be getting free solar. Day 1, you schmuck.

http://reneweconomy.com.au/marshalls-fi ... lan-68601/


The newly elected South Australia premier, the Liberal Steven Marshall, has made his first promise – his government intends to kill the Tesla plan for the world’s biggest “virtual power plant” that would install batteries in low income households for no cost.

The Tesla plan – which aimed to install 5kW of solar and a 13.5kWh Tesla Powerwall 2 battery storage unit in 50,000 homes – would have created a virtual power plant with 250MW of capacity and 650MWh of storage.

The Tesla plan was announced just before the official start of the election campaign. The first two stages of the proposal – for 1,100 Housing Trust homes – is apparently locked in with a $2 million grant and a $30 million loan – but the broader 3rd phase is not yet set in stone.

“No, that’s not part of our agenda,” Marshall told ABC’s Radio National breakfast program, just minutes before being sworn in as premier.

Instead, Marshall said his government would proceed with his previously announced commitment to a $100 million subsidy to 40,000 homes, where he would offer $2,500 for each battery storage unit installed.

“(Former premier Jay Weatherill) was doing it for Housing Trust homes in South Australia … that’s not part of our plan. What we are going to do is provide a subsidy to get (those with) solar rooftops systems with some storage capacity.”

Marshall’s plans would, of course, be very difficult to access to low income households because it would still require an upfront capital payments that they would likely be unable to afford. And they do not already have rooftop solar.

It’s an extraordinary start for the new Liberal government – promising to ditch a private initiative that would provide loans to low income households in favour of a $100 million government subsidy that would be out of reach of those households most in need of it.

So much for free markets. But it also raises the issue of sovereign risk.

If the Liberal Party is to do backflips on initiatives like this, will it also renege on the other contracts entered into by Labor’s Renewable Technology Fund – and there are many of those, for larger scale storage developments, and for a variety of smaller and micro-grid proposals.

It could be that the Tesla virtual power plant could go ahead – seeing that it is privately funded and requires a retailer to be chosen to help roll out the scheme and act as an intermediary.

The idea was to install the solar and battery storage for free, and deliver a reduction of around one third in the electricity bills of 25,000 Housing Trust homes, and another 25,000 private low income households. Investors would provide the capital.

However, given the new government’s antipathy to the scheme, it is entirely possible the tender process may be delayed and the private investors would not want to go ahead in such a hostile political environment.

It could also have an impact on Australia’s only solar manufacturer, Tindo Solar, which was looking to significantly increase its production capacity at its Adelaide manufacturing plant, and hire more employees of course.

That’s because the Tesla plan would require half of the solar capacity to come from local manufacturers. It was also seen as an excellent platform for a new retailer to enter the South Australian market. The lack of competition in South Australia is one of the principal reasons for its high electricity prices.

The irony is that Marshall admitted he could see the benefits of battery storage – both at utility level and in households.

But he re-iterated his intent to scrap the state’s renewable energy target, because it would push up prices – even though the amount of projects under construction and promised by the new owner of the Whyalla steelworks would likely take the stake to Weatherill’s 75 per cent target, probably several years earlier.

Marshall also plans a new interconnector to NSW. Marshall says this will add to the “affordable reliable baseload” the state could access “when it’s not windy or sunny” in South Australia.

But appears to ignore the fact that NSW is already the state with the highest dependence on imports, even more than South Australia and may not been a position to export power to anyone.

But he also said the interconnector will allow for the “excess renewables” from South Australia to be exported to other states, “lowering prices across the entire nation.”

Hang on, didn’t you just say that the investment in renewables had and would push prices up?
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Re: The South Australian Political Landscape

Postby Jimmy_041 » Mon Mar 19, 2018 12:09 pm

morell wrote:And we're off.

New SA Premier Steven Marshall vows to scrap Tesla's plans for world's biggest virtual power plant targeting low income households, in favour of a $100 million subsidy for those homes already with solar.

Makes total sense. :lol: :rolleyes:

Going to be a fun four years


Is that what they promised?
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Re: The South Australian Political Landscape

Postby stan » Mon Mar 19, 2018 12:17 pm

Jimmy_041 wrote:
Magellan wrote:Irrespective of who you 'barrack' for in the political game, at least Saturday night delivered the state a majority government and relative stability compared to the horse-trading and deal-making that would've occurred under a hung parliament.


Still going to have to deal with the Upper House (the one Rau wanted to abolish)
It will be interesting to see if Labor go the scorched earth policy like what's been happening in the federal sphere for the past 9 years
With Liberals and Labor both on 8, 2x SA Best, probably 2 Greens, John Darley & Dennis Hood; they probably have a fair chance of getting most sane ideas through

I had an interesting conversation with Darley about Geoff Brock on Saturday........
No No No, Steve has already told the upper house to get in line and back his reform.
Read my reply. It is directed at you because you have double standards
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Re: The South Australian Political Landscape

Postby GWW » Mon Mar 19, 2018 12:20 pm

Any thoughts on the ministry?

Chapman - Attorney General?

Lucas - Treasurer (confirmed)

Wingard - Transport?

Spiers - ?

?

?
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Re: The South Australian Political Landscape

Postby stan » Mon Mar 19, 2018 12:21 pm

Booney wrote:My rich mates with big solar panels need batteries, those of you on low income won't be getting free solar. Day 1, you schmuck.

http://reneweconomy.com.au/marshalls-fi ... lan-68601/


The newly elected South Australia premier, the Liberal Steven Marshall, has made his first promise – his government intends to kill the Tesla plan for the world’s biggest “virtual power plant” that would install batteries in low income households for no cost.

The Tesla plan – which aimed to install 5kW of solar and a 13.5kWh Tesla Powerwall 2 battery storage unit in 50,000 homes – would have created a virtual power plant with 250MW of capacity and 650MWh of storage.

The Tesla plan was announced just before the official start of the election campaign. The first two stages of the proposal – for 1,100 Housing Trust homes – is apparently locked in with a $2 million grant and a $30 million loan – but the broader 3rd phase is not yet set in stone.

“No, that’s not part of our agenda,” Marshall told ABC’s Radio National breakfast program, just minutes before being sworn in as premier.

Instead, Marshall said his government would proceed with his previously announced commitment to a $100 million subsidy to 40,000 homes, where he would offer $2,500 for each battery storage unit installed.

“(Former premier Jay Weatherill) was doing it for Housing Trust homes in South Australia … that’s not part of our plan. What we are going to do is provide a subsidy to get (those with) solar rooftops systems with some storage capacity.”

Marshall’s plans would, of course, be very difficult to access to low income households because it would still require an upfront capital payments that they would likely be unable to afford. And they do not already have rooftop solar.

It’s an extraordinary start for the new Liberal government – promising to ditch a private initiative that would provide loans to low income households in favour of a $100 million government subsidy that would be out of reach of those households most in need of it.

So much for free markets. But it also raises the issue of sovereign risk.

If the Liberal Party is to do backflips on initiatives like this, will it also renege on the other contracts entered into by Labor’s Renewable Technology Fund – and there are many of those, for larger scale storage developments, and for a variety of smaller and micro-grid proposals.

It could be that the Tesla virtual power plant could go ahead – seeing that it is privately funded and requires a retailer to be chosen to help roll out the scheme and act as an intermediary.

The idea was to install the solar and battery storage for free, and deliver a reduction of around one third in the electricity bills of 25,000 Housing Trust homes, and another 25,000 private low income households. Investors would provide the capital.

However, given the new government’s antipathy to the scheme, it is entirely possible the tender process may be delayed and the private investors would not want to go ahead in such a hostile political environment.

It could also have an impact on Australia’s only solar manufacturer, Tindo Solar, which was looking to significantly increase its production capacity at its Adelaide manufacturing plant, and hire more employees of course.

That’s because the Tesla plan would require half of the solar capacity to come from local manufacturers. It was also seen as an excellent platform for a new retailer to enter the South Australian market. The lack of competition in South Australia is one of the principal reasons for its high electricity prices.

The irony is that Marshall admitted he could see the benefits of battery storage – both at utility level and in households.

But he re-iterated his intent to scrap the state’s renewable energy target, because it would push up prices – even though the amount of projects under construction and promised by the new owner of the Whyalla steelworks would likely take the stake to Weatherill’s 75 per cent target, probably several years earlier.

Marshall also plans a new interconnector to NSW. Marshall says this will add to the “affordable reliable baseload” the state could access “when it’s not windy or sunny” in South Australia.

But appears to ignore the fact that NSW is already the state with the highest dependence on imports, even more than South Australia and may not been a position to export power to anyone.

But he also said the interconnector will allow for the “excess renewables” from South Australia to be exported to other states, “lowering prices across the entire nation.”

Hang on, didn’t you just say that the investment in renewables had and would push prices up?
Yes I am eagerly piecing together his energy plan as we speak.

NSW renewables = cheap and reliable.
SA renewables = expensive and un reliable.

Enough piss take. He actually means that we will be using Black Coal generated power for base load, which is the majority of NSWs generation.

Although they suck energy from Qld pretty hard as NSW has many times a year where they cant support the own demand.
Read my reply. It is directed at you because you have double standards
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Re: The South Australian Political Landscape

Postby stan » Mon Mar 19, 2018 12:22 pm

GWW wrote:Any thoughts on the ministry?

Chapman - Attorney General?

Lucas - Treasurer (confirmed)

Wingard - Transport?

Spiers - ?

?

?
Vicki Chapman lol, keep the knives away from that piece of work lol.

Spiers will probably get the environment.
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Re: The South Australian Political Landscape

Postby MW » Mon Mar 19, 2018 12:23 pm

GWW wrote:Any thoughts on the ministry?

Chapman - Attorney General?

Lucas - Treasurer (confirmed)

Wingard - Transport?

Spiers - ?

?

?


Tarzia - Used Cars and Realestate
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Re: The South Australian Political Landscape

Postby Booney » Mon Mar 19, 2018 12:28 pm

Jimmy_041 wrote:
morell wrote:And we're off.

New SA Premier Steven Marshall vows to scrap Tesla's plans for world's biggest virtual power plant targeting low income households, in favour of a $100 million subsidy for those homes already with solar.

Makes total sense. :lol: :rolleyes:

Going to be a fun four years


Is that what they promised?


Is that the lies the electoral commission asked them to retract and they politely refused to?

Yeah, that one.
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